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RESEARCH STUDY

RESEARCH

Independent Influence of Parental Myopia on Childhood Myopia in a Dose-Related Manner in 2,055 Trios: The Hong Kong Children Eye Study

AUTHOR:

Shu Min Tang, Ka Wai Kam, Amenda N. French, Marco Yu, Li Jia Chen, Alvin L. Young, Kathryn A. Rose, Clement C. Tham, Chi Pui Pang, Jason C. Yam

SPONSOR/INSTITUTION:

YEAR PUBLISHED:

2020

PUBLICATION:

American Journal of Ophthalmology

KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • The purpose of this study is to determine the effects on childhood myopia of parental myopia, parental education, children's outdoor time, and children's near work. A total of 6,155 subjects in 2,055 family trios (1 child and both parents). 

  • Cycloplegic autorefraction was measured for children and noncycloplegic autorefraction for parents. Parental education, children's outdoor time, and near work were collected by questionnaires. 

  • Children were categorized into 10 groups based on parental myopia levels. 

  • Associations of the above factors with myopia were evaluated by regression analyses. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROCs) for myopia were evaluated.

  • Mild parental myopia did not increase childhood myopia's risk, but the risk was 11.22-folds when both parents were highly myopic. 

  • Higher parental education (Father: OR 1.08, P = .046; Mother: OR 1.11, P = .001) and more reading time of children were risk factors (OR 1.21, P = .044). 

  • Reduced odds of myopia were associated with more time spent on outdoor activities (OR 0.78, P = .017). 

  • Notably, all these factors became insignificant after adjustment, except for parental myopia. Children with more severe parental myopia spent more time on reading, but less on electronic devices. 

  • Parental myopic status alone accounted for 11.82% of myopia variation in children. With age and parental myopia, the AUROC for myopia was 0.731.

  • Among parental and environmental factors, parental myopia confers, in a dose-related manner, the strongest independent effect on childhood myopia. 

  • Therefore, children with high risk of myopia can be identified for early prevention, based on parental myopia data.