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RESEARCH STUDY

RESEARCH

Relationship Between Vision Impairment and Ability to Perform Activities of Daily Living

AUTHOR:

Sharon Haymes

SPONSOR/INSTITUTION:

YEAR PUBLISHED:

2002

PUBLICATION:

Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics

KEY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Clinical vision impairment measures are highly correlated with capacity to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), as measured by the Melbourne Low Vision ADL Index (MLVAI).

SUMMARY

Purpose: To determine the relationship between clinical measures of vision impairment and the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs).


Methods: One hundred and twenty subjects with low vision from a variety of causes participated in the study. Vision impairment was assessed under binocular conditions by measuring distance visual acuity, near word acuity, Melbourne Edge Test contrast sensitivity, Pelli–Robson Chart contrast sensitivity and visual fields. The ADL performance was assessed using the Melbourne Low Vision ADL Index (MLVAI), which is in part an observed performance assessment of instrumental ADLs and in part a self-report assessment of basic self-care ADLs.


Results: All vision measures had a high, statistically significant correlation with MLVAI total score. Near word acuity, had the strongest correlation (rs=−0.86, p < 0.001), followed by Melbourne Edge Test contrast sensitivity (rs=0.80, p < 0.001). Visual field had the weakest correlation (rs=0.56, p < 0.001). Together, age, near word acuity, Melbourne Edge Test contrast sensitivity and visual field accounted for 82.2% (adjusted R2, p < 0.001) of the variance in MLVAI total score. All correlations obtained were higher for the observed performance assessment of instrumental ADLs than for the self-report assessment of basic self-care ADLs.


Conclusions: Clinical vision impairment measures are highly correlated with capacity to perform ADLs, as measured by the MLVAI.